Theorizing the Rise of Right Wing Populism in the Post-Globalist Era: Toward an Integrative Approach

Theorizing the Rise of Right Wing Populism in the Post-Globalist Era: Toward an Integrative Approach

Events, Lawrence J. Saha, S A Hamed Hosseini
Seyed A. HOSSEINI FARADONBEH, The University of Newcastle, Australia and Lawrence SAHA, Australian National University, Australia

 

Abstract Text (Abstract ID: 101047):

Populism, as a concept, generally implies a mobilized support for the political, cultural and economic preferences of the populace as opposed to those of the elite, foreigners, intellectuals, media, government, corporations, scientific bodies, ethnic minorities, immigrants/refugees, or any other social group or community whose identity or interest differs from the widely-idealized image of a typical countryperson. However, populism does not always appear in society as a well-articulated doctrine or a coherent group attitude with a number of detectable rigid principles. It normally emerges in the form of popular rhetoric that taps into the populations’ emotions, and advocates quick solutions without a proper understanding of the root causes of the problems and the complexities of social institutions.In this process, on the one hand, macro socioeconomic status appears to be a primary factor but only in association with other primary determinants (e.g. age, regional/rural residential status, ethnicity, gender, education, religion, and occupation), and this association occurs only in a relative sense (e.g. a relative decline in the middle-class status compared to lower/under class status). On the other hand, social psychological factors such as social anxiety, sense of insecurity, resentment, uncertainty, humility, and ressentiment (e.g. waning white privileges recently accelerated by economic liberalization and austerity regimes), mediate the macro factors. In addition, the social historical residues of centuries of colonialist-patriarchal culture, such as class-racial discrimination, patriotism, misogyny, and racism, plus personality factors like dogmatism, closed-mindedness and authoritarianism play a role in the translation of macro-structural changes and political discourses into personal and group actions and attitudes. In this paper, we develop a more macro and micro integrative approach to theoretically explain the emergence of right wing populist movements in the post-globalist era.

Presentation at ISA World Congress in Sociology, Toronto, July 2018

Continue reading “Theorizing the Rise of Right Wing Populism in the Post-Globalist Era: Toward an Integrative Approach”

Researching Collective Action and Social Change: Extending Michael Burawoy’s Extended Case Method

Researching Collective Action and Social Change: Extending Michael Burawoy’s Extended Case Method

Events, Thomas Muhr

Author: Thomas MUHR and Susana MELO, Habib University Karachi, Pakistan

Abstract Text:
This paper proposes a socio-spatial ethnographic methodology to research projects and processes of
neoliberal mainstream contestation. We build on Michael Burawoy’s extended case method and the notion of ‘global ethnography’, which we put in dialogue with theorisations of place, space and scale. We argue that a case can socio-spatially extend out beyond a particular place-bound ‘site’ or ‘case’ in order to account for multiple interconnected places at different geographical scales. This approach allows for empirically sustaining how neoliberalism as a project and as a process of social transformation is being counteracted and displaced in different geopolitical configurations. Muhr’s spatial ethnography of the construction of the Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America Peoples Trade Agreement (ALBATCP), as a distinct post-neoliberal democratic project, illustrates the deployment of our methodological proposal.

Group: RC48 Social Movements, Collective Actions and Social Change
Session Selection: Future(s) of Democracy in the Post-Neoliberal
Era: Problems, Protests, and Prospects Continue reading “Researching Collective Action and Social Change: Extending Michael Burawoy’s Extended Case Method”

The Future of Capital and Its Alternatives in 21st Century: The Essentiality of Economic Democratization

The Future of Capital and Its Alternatives in 21st Century: The Essentiality of Economic Democratization

Barry K. Gills, Events, S A Hamed Hosseini
Seyed A. HOSSEINI FARADONBEH, The University of Newcastle, Australia and Barry GILLS, University of Helsinki, Finland

 

Abstract Text:

In 21st century, “Capital” requires a more comprehensive and applicable definition than merely a social process where money makes more money through production relations. Capital, in its material manifestation, is a socially organized ‘process’, through which surplus value is produced and controlled by ‘unsustainable’ and ‘un-sovereign’ ways of exploiting labour (both manual and intellectual), land (and other commons), nature (non-renewable sources of energy and the earth’s bio-capacity including the climate). It is, however, important to equally emphasize, and theorize how Capital can also immaterially but objectively colonize and depoliticize societal/communal solidarities (from the level of household, to the level of world community).Thus, a critical analysis of Capital/ist relations requires the theorization of not only the exploitation of labour, land and nature, but also the systemic colonization of communal solidarities as non-material Commons, through the de-democratization of collective production and reproduction relations. Austerity regimes, for instance, are not only about protecting the corporate interest, e.g. by dispossessing social welfare, but also about an antagonistic relation towards democratic self-management, collaborative determination, and self-sufficient uses of resources. The colonization of social solidarities by Capital creates a fertile breeding ground for the resurgence of ethno-populist responses. We will argue here that the profound democratization of economic relations can liberate the transformative movements from the immense gravity of Capital by overcoming the dilemma of surviving while transforming ubiquitous capitalist relations.

Group: RC48 Social Movements, Collective Actions and Social ChangeSession Selection: Future(s) of Democracy in the Post-Neoliberal Era: Problems, Protests, and Prospects

Continue reading “The Future of Capital and Its Alternatives in 21st Century: The Essentiality of Economic Democratization”

Democratic Eco-Socialism as a Real Utopia: Transitioning to an Alternative World System

Democratic Eco-Socialism as a Real Utopia: Transitioning to an Alternative World System

Books, Hans Baer

A/Prof. Hans Baer

As global population growth continues to skyrocket, increasingly strained resources have made one thing clear: the desperate need for an alternative to capitalism. In Democratic Eco-Socialism as a Real Utopia, Hans Baer outlines the urgent need to reevaluate historical definitions of socialism, commit to social equality and justice, and prioritize environmental sustainability. Democratic Eco-socialism, as he terms it, is a system capable of mobilizing people around the world, albeit in different ways, to prevent on-going human socio-economic and environmental degradation, and anthropogenic climate change.

Order a copy

Continue reading “Democratic Eco-Socialism as a Real Utopia: Transitioning to an Alternative World System”

Researching the Emergence of Right-Wing Populism in the 21st Century

Researching the Emergence of Right-Wing Populism in the 21st Century

Events

RC42 Social Psychology (host committee)


Populism is both a political and academic concept which varies widely in its use. As found within the social sciences, it is generally regarded as a  mobilized support for the political, cultural and economic preferences of the mainstream populous as opposed to those of the elite, intellectuals, media, governments, public institutions, and scientific and civic organizations. There are populists of the left, center and the right on the political spectrum, but currently attention has focused on right-wing populism as an increasingly transformative force. The social psychological and sociological accounts of populism are much related to the research traditions of studies of authoritarianism, dogmatism, Fascism and closed-mindedness, and the social conditions which facilitate their emergence. How perceptive/effective is this legacy for understanding today’s populist resurgence? For this session, we specifically wish to focus on the recent upsurge of right-wing populism, particularly since it is linked with many contentious attitudes, such as anti-immigration, anti-elites, Islamophobia, homophobia, and national isolationism, among others. The session is open to micro and macro studies which help the understanding of populism using either qualitative and/or quantitative data.

Session Organizers:
Lawrence SAHA, Australian National University, Australia, lawrence.saha@anu.edu.au
Seyed A. HOSSEINI FARADONBEH, The University of Newcastle, Australia, hamed.hosseini@newcastle.edu.au
Future(s) of Democracy in the Post-Neoliberal Era: Problems, Protests, and Prospects

Future(s) of Democracy in the Post-Neoliberal Era: Problems, Protests, and Prospects

Events

RC48 Social Movements, Collective Actions and Social Change (host committee)

XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology (July 15-21, 2018):

Globally, neoliberalism is no longer the mobilising tool it once was. The neoliberal mainstream has been displaced, initially from the radical Left, but increasingly, and simultaneously, from the far Right. From anti-austerity to left nationalism, from solidarity economy to the eco-social commons, democratic alternatives to market rule have gained considerable ground, but have faltered with the emergence of new forces for autocracy and ethno-populism. This panel addresses the major challenges faced by these post-neoliberal democratic movements, in the current context of authoritarian populist resurgence, rising ethno-nationalism and global geopolitical polarizations., How are these democratic alternatives emerging, surviving, or evolving through social movements, and where are they gaining ground or declining? How may they be converging? How may they respond to the authoritarian alternatives? Where are they marginalised, and why? In this spirit we seek new theory and reflection beyond the current political nexus.

Session Organizers:
Seyed A. HOSSEINI FARADONBEH, The University of Newcastle, Australia,
Barry GILLS, University of Helsinki, Finland,
James GOODMAN, University of Technology Sydney, Australia,  
Globalization, Resource Extraction, and Social Movement Mobilization

Globalization, Resource Extraction, and Social Movement Mobilization

Events

RC24 Environment and Society (host committee)

The colonization of the Americas and other regions has gone hand in hand with natural resource extraction, which has included economies built on minerals, forestry resources, fisheries, and – more recently – oil and gas. Shifts towards globalization and knowledge-based economies within the urban centres of the global north have not resulted in moving away from resource extractivism. Rather, we see a reconfiguration of the commodification and extraction of earth resources that underlies contemporary lifestyles of overconsumption for the affluent of the world. This reconfiguration of natural resource extraction has often involved reaching further and further into new sites in remote and rural areas, including extensive “land use change” in biomes such as the Amazon Basin, Boreal forests and the Arctic. It has also involved the increasing commodification of resources such as drinking water. At the same time, this reconfiguration of resource extractivism has been met with resistance by environmental and Indigenous social movements. This session invites papers that focus on social processes of mobilization and resistance to resource extraction. The objective is to transcend the north-south division that has influenced research and provide a space for comparison.

Session Organizers:
Mark STODDART, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada, mstoddart@mun.ca,
Deborah DELGADO PUGLEY, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Belgium, deborah.delgado@pucp.pe
Carbon Capitalism, Climate Capitalism, Energy Democracy

Carbon Capitalism, Climate Capitalism, Energy Democracy

Events

RC02 Economy and Society (host committee)


Although the scientific consensus on causes and implication of global warming is well established, the climate crisis has provoked three distinct political-economic projects, rooted in differing class fractions and social interests, which currently vie for hegemony at different levels and regions of the world-system. Carbon capitalism is a project of ‘business as usual’ (in the Stern report’s terminology), with efficiency improvements (and possible sunsetting of coal) but no major changes to the political ecology of contemporary capitalism. Climate capitalism proposes the ecological modernization of the energy base of capitalism, by redirecting flows of capital away from fossil fuels, and toward more climatically benign sources of energy including hydropower, solar, wind and nuclear. The first two projects are capital-centric: they leave the class structure of capitalism untouched, including the concentration of economic power in the hands of a relatively small group of major investors, executives and corporate directors. In contrast, energy democracy finds its social base in environmental and other progressive movements, including sections of the labour movement. It mandates a dual power shift, from fossil-fuel power to renewables (decarbonization) and from corporate oligarchy to public, democratic control of economic decisions (democratization). This session welcomes papers exploring the sociology of these projects, singly or in combination, especially analyses that foreground issues of political economy and political ecology.

Session Organizers:
William CARROLL, University of Victoria, Canada, wcarroll@uvic.ca
JP SAPINSKI, University of Victoria, Canada, sapinski@uvic.ca
Reorganizing Globalization

Reorganizing Globalization

Events

RC07 Futures Research (host committee)

How do the major political changes of 2016 (Brexit, election of Trump) fit into the larger transformations of globalization? What are the features of 21st century globalization compared to 20th century globalization? What are pattern changes in the roles of advanced economies and emerging economies (such as China and the BRICS)?

Session Organizers:
Jan P. NEDERVEEN PIETERSE, University of California at Santa Barbara, USA, jnp@global.ucsb.edu
Barry GILLS, University of Helsinki, Finland, barry.gills@helsinki.fi
Social Movement Theory Beyond Developmentalism

Social Movement Theory Beyond Developmentalism

Events

RC48 Social Movements, Collective Actions and Social Change (host committee)

XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology (July 15-21, 2018):

This session debates developmentalism in social movement theory. Social movement theory, implicitly or otherwise, defines the movement by its developmental epoch. Periodisation commonly constructs ‘leading edge’ movements in the socio-economic heartlands, as ‘new’, relegating the rest. With the globalization of development crises – from climate crisis to financial crisis – development ideology has become politicized, for all societies. The ‘developed’ world has itself become the key site of global development problems, while late industrialisers now claim a role as drivers for alternative social models. Increasingly, social movements can gain a key role in challenging and transforming developmentalist models and ideologies. In this context, movement projects can circulate and find new traction across global divides – from occupy the squares, to climate justice. With transnationally-defined social and ecological crises, social movement theory can find new scope and relevance by engaging with critiques of developmentalism. What might this add to our understanding of social movements? What possibilities may this open-up, especially for strengthening Southern theory of movements? What may be its epistemological assumptions or methodological biases? And where, in terms of places and social forces, may it have most application and purchase?

Session Organizers:
James GOODMAN, University of Technology Sydney, Australia, james.goodman@uts.edu.au
Debal SINGHAROY, Indira Gandhi National Open University, India, debal_singharoy@yahoo.co.in