A new language for a new beginning

In the beginning was the word, and the word was the first thing to begin with!

A|B|C|D|E|F|G|H|I|J|K|L|M|N|O|P|Q|R|S|T|U|V|W|X|Y|Z

A.


 

Alterity

Anthropocene

B.


 

C.


 

Capital

Capitalocene

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E.


 

Eco-sufficiency

F.


 

G.


 

H.


 

I.


 

J.


 

K.


 

L.


 

M.


 

N.


 

O.


 

P.


 

Q.


 

R.


 

N.


 

S.


 

T.


 

Transversalism

Transversalism "is identified by its being founded on an evolutionary move into a post-capitalist network of democratically governed relatively autonomous alternative systems, and by the strong aspiration to build meaningful common (shared) ideological and political action orientations that transcend counterproductive divisions among transformative movements. It seeks an accommodative mode of social consciousness centered on a common ground  for  dialogue, collective learning,  and  concrete  action among multiple progressive identities and ideological visions within the field of transformative movement praxes. Transversalism grounds its interpretation of cosmopolitanist values on recognizing but not being limited to local, grassroots, and communal particularities. It  aims at consolidating political coalitions and  ideational accommodation between social groups on both a class and a non-class basis. Therefore, it does not imply uniformity, a general theory of social emancipation and the collapse of differences, autonomies and local identities. This requires an attitude of openness and the intention of exchanging mutual experiences (via engagement of Self with Others) and ideas across a variety of local fields of transformative movements of resistance.

Transversalism grounds cosmopolitanist values on local, grassroots and communal particularities. This requires openness and the intention of exchanging experiences and ideas across a variety of local fields of resistance. Transversalism consists of following elements: (1) recognition of diversity and difference, (2) dialogue (deliberation across differences), (3) systemic self-reflection, (4) intentional openness (intention to explore the reality of the Other), (5) critical awareness of the inter-sectional nature of power relations that affects interconnections, and finally (6) commitment to create alterity through hybridization and creolization of ideas and deeds.

U.


 

V.


 

W.


 

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X.


 

Z.